Tag Archives: polar vortex

Warm Winter? But it Felt So Cold!

Here, that is – where I live.

It turns out that last month was the fourth hottest March for the entire planet on record, according to NASA. In fact, it’s been 29 years – 349 consecutive months, to be precise – since we’ve seen a month that was actually cooler than the historical average. And it also turns out that the changing weather is making a lot of people very hungry.

The data is now in, and for the whole world, our frigid March – shivering in the path of a wobbly “polar vortex” – was actually 1.2°F hotter than the average global temperature for the last 30 years. A look at the global temperature map tells a remarkable story:

assets-climatecentral-org-images-uploads-news-3_19_14_Andrea_LandTempAnom2014Winter-500x386Notice how there are just two or three cool spots (in blue) on the planet. Midwest and Eastern North America were wicked cold, and some places in western Siberia and Uzbekistan were too. But now look at the rest of the world: all of South America, Africa, China, and Australia were warm (in red). And Europe, Alaska and eastern Siberia were downright hot, compared to the historical average.

A bad month perhaps? No such luck. The whole winter – freezing for us – was very warm for the Earth as a whole. It was cold here under the wobbly winter vortex, and warm just about everywhere else. In fact, the whole world was 1.57°F hotter than average.

Maybe all of last year was better? Well, you decide: It was the fourth hottest year on record according to NOAA. And three of the four hottest years have all occurred since the year 2000. And as we noted, it’s been almost three decades since we’ve seen one single month that was actually cooler than the 20th Century average.

The world is warming, and maybe it’s time to take note. The UN’s climate panel, which convenes the world’s climate scientists to issue an advisory report every 5-6 years, has warned that climate change will mean more hunger and rising food prices, falling hardest on the hungry poor.

And almost on cue, our food prices shot up last month, largely because of persistent drought in the West and extreme weather in the Midwest. Wholesale beef prices increased 23% over last year, and pork soared by an amazing 56%. Globally, food prices increased 2.4% in March, and they’re more than double what they averaged in 2002-2004. If you spend most of your income feeding your family – as the world’s poor do – this is a really big deal.

And maybe that’s why more and more Christians are beginning see global climate disruption as having a lot to do with their faith. The Christian Reformed Church has passed a call to action to confront climate change, which they call a core gospel issue.  “Climate change,” they say, “poses a significant threat to future generations, the poor, and the vulnerable.”

In this, the CRC has followed in the footsteps of the 190-nation Lausanne Conference on World Evangelization, which in 2012 issued a comprehensive call to action for climate justice. “The world is in crisis,” they said, “brought on by global climate change, deforestation, pollution, loss of species to extinction and water stress. These threats place a heavy burden on the poor….”

Meanwhile, here at Good Hand Farm, we’re still wrapped in extra sweaters, as we watch in vain for our first asparagus and pea shoots to push through the frigid ground. But around the world, it’s unusually hot, food’s getting scarcer, and unless ordinary people take action, it’s hard to see how hunger won’t keep getting worse.

The World is Getting Hot. So Why am I Freezing?

The results are in, and 2013 ranks as the fourth hottest year for global heat since record-keeping began in 1880. That’s 37 straight years with above-average global temperatures. The last below-normal year was 1976, when I was still in college. All 13 years of the new century have ranked among the hottest 15 ever on record. And nine of the hottest ten on record have all occurred since the millennium.

Wow. I guess it’s really hot, right?

assets-climatecentral-org-images-uploads-news-1_21_14_andrew_10warmestyears-660x372Um, well, let me check. Yup, just like I thought. It’s cold out there, and it’s snowing! With these freak winter storms, the U.S. has registered the second coldest January since 2000, although well short of 2011’s January freeze. And everyone’s talking about that strange new term – the “polar vortex.” It seems something has kicked open the door to the Arctic, and the cold is pouring in everywhere.

Actually, not quite everywhere. While the Central and Eastern U.S. shiver and dig, it’s eerily warm in Alaska and the West. Last Sunday, it was warmer in Homer, Alaska – 55°F – than anywhere in the lower 48, except for South Florida. And last Tuesday, Nome, Alaska, that remotest of Arctic outposts, hit a record 51°F. That’s FIFTY-ONE DEGREES in January! No need for Balto under these circumstances. You could rescue Nome by bicycle.

And it’s not just Alaska. Los Angeles registered average highs of 75°F for the month of January, a full seven degrees above normal. And coupled with the heat, California is in its third straight year of crippling drought, with the state’s reservoirs 30 percent below the long-term average, and widely-publicized forecasts for spikes in prices at the grocery store.

But let’s not quibble. The Central and Eastern U.S. are feeling pretty darn cold just now. After an amazingly warm decade in these parts, what’s up? Are all those scientists still sure about the perils of global warming?

No Question, It’s Been Getting Much Hotter

Both NASA and NOAA – the nation’s twin atmospheric research powerhouses – have compiled the data for 2013, and it was another global scorcher. Using slightly different methods, they ranked 2013 the fourth hottest (NOAA) or the seventh (NASA) – but the difference between the two was a mere 0.02o Fahrenheit. Continue reading